First Maryland Infantry US

Civil War Congressional Medal of Honor awards

Medal Of Honor - The Congressional Medal Of Honor - The Medal of Honor, established by joint resolution of Congress, 12 July 1862 (amended by Act of 9 July 1918 and Act of 25 July 1963) is awarded in the name of Congress to a person who, while a member of the Armed Services, distinguishes himself conspicuously by gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while engaged in an action against any enemy of The United States; while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force; or while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which The United States is not a belligerent party. The deed performed must have been one of personal bravery or self-sacrifice so conspicuous as to clearly distinguish the individual above his comrades and must have involved risk of life. Incontestable proof of the performance of service is exacted and each recommendation for award of this decoration is considered on the standard of extraordinary merit.The Medal of Honor, established by joint resolution of Congress, 12 July 1862 (amended by Act of 9 July 1918 and Act of 25 July 1963) is awarded in the name of Congress to a person who, while a member of the Armed Services, distinguishes himself conspicuously by gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while engaged in an action against any enemy of The United States; while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force; or while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which The United States is not a belligerent party. The deed performed must have been one of personal bravery or self-sacrifice so conspicuous as to clearly distinguish the individual above his comrades and must have involved risk of life. Incontestable proof of the performance of service is exacted and each recommendation for award of this decoration is considered on the standard of extraordinary merit.

The Medal of Honor was first issued during the Civil War, and since it was the only military award for valor during that war, 1,527 medals were awarded. By the time of the Spanish American War, there were more earned medals available for distribution, and the Medal of Honor became the supreme honor. During the military action in Vietnam, a much longer conflict than the Civil War, 238 medals were awarded.

Early in the Civil War, a medal for individual valor was proposed to General-in-Chief of the Army Winfield Scott. But Scott felt medals smacked of European affectation and killed the idea.

The medal found support in the Navy, however, where it was felt recognition of courage in strife was needed. Public Resolution 82, containing a provision for a Navy medal of valor, was signed into law by President Abraham Lincoln on December 21, 1861. The medal was "to be bestowed upon such petty officers, seamen, landsmen, and Marines as shall most distinguish themselves by their gallantry and other seamanlike qualities during the present war."

Shortly after this, a resolution similar in wording was introduced on behalf of the Army. Signed into law July 12, 1862, the measure provided for awarding a medal of honor "to such noncommissioned officers and privates as shall most distinguish themselves by their gallantry in action, and other soldier like qualities, during the present insurrection."

Although it was created for the Civil War, Congress made the Medal of Honor a permanent decoration in 1863. 1,520 Medals were awarded during the Civil War, 1,195 to the Army, 308 to the Navy, 17 to the Marines. 25 Medals were awarded posthumously.

 

 

CADWALLADER, ABEL G.

Rank and organization: Corporal, Company H, 1st Maryland Infantry. Place and date: At Hatchers Run and Dabneys Mills, Va., 6 February 1865. Entered service at:------. Birth: Baltimore Md. Date of issue: 5 January 1897. Citation: Gallantly planted the colors on the enemy's works in advance of the arrival of his regiment.

Four soldiers earned the Medal of Honor in the action with Confederate forces at Dabney's Mills, Virginia, on February 6, 1865, and six more men earned Medals of Honor on the same day for heroism at Hatcher's Run. Corporal Abel Cadwallader was the only one of these ten to be cited for his heroism at both actions, and was awarded the Medal of Honor for gallantly planting the flag of his regiment on the enemy's works while in advance of the other soldiers of his unit.

 

 

 

STEWART, JOSEPH

Rank and organization: Private, Company G, 1st Maryland Infantry. Place and date. At Five Forks, Va., 1 April 1865. Entered service at: ------. Birth: Ireland. Date of issue: 27 April 1865. Citation. Capture of a rebel flag.

 

 

 

 

TAYLOR, WILLIAM

Company H and 2d Lt. Company M, 1st Maryland Infantry. At Front Royal, Va., on May 23, 1862 and Weldon, Va., on Aug. 19, 1864 (Buried: Loudon Park, Officers Section, Grave 16)

 

He was recognized for his action at the Weldon railroad.  Ayresí 2nd division was hard pressed by a heavy rebel flanking assault.  Col Dushane pulled the 1st MD back to cover the open hole in the 5th Corps front.  The Maryland brigade held the position for 3 hours until reinforcements could be brought forward in the process taking the brunt of the rebel attack.  During the fight, the entire color guard was shot down one by one and badly wounded. The flag fell seven times.  Then, Lt Taylor rushed forward, took the flag and carried it until relieved at the end of the fight in which the rebels were finally driven back.  Afterward, Lt. Colonel William Wilson is quoted as saying: ďAt no time in my life could I have shed tears more freely than when I saw the men fall around my colors as fast as I could count one, two, and three.Ē  After the war, Lt Taylor made the proposal to donate the flag to the State government.

 

In the battle the 1st MD lost 1 officer, 1 soldier, and Col Wilsonís horse.  Wounded were 4 officers and 50 men.

 

 

 

 

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